Capture

WHAT IS CARBON CAPTURE?

Carbon dioxide (CO2), is the world’s most common manmade greenhouse gas and is widely responsible for the climate challenges the world faces today. CO2 is a by-product of fossil fuel, chemical, steel and cement utilisation or production.

With carbon capture CO2 is extracted in industrial processes rather than released into the environment. The carbon dioxide is captured by being attracted and retained by a liquid or solid material. It is then subjected to a change in pressure or temperature, transported and safely stored deep underground, where it can remain for at least a thousand years.

 

WHY DO WE NEED IT?

The demonstration of carbon capture at an industrial level shows that more than 95 per cent of CO2 can be saved from reaching the environment. This fact alone makes carbon capture and storage a critical component in a modern, fuel-efficient future. No other technology offers such significant reductions in carbon dioxide emissions by industry.

 

REDUCING THE COST

Carbon capture is the most expensive part of the carbon capture and storage process. The cost of operating the capture plant, the capital investment in the equipment, and the solvent or filtration technologies used make the capture process prohibitive in certain circumstances. CO2CRC is currently working to reduce the cost of carbon capture by focusing its research in each of these areas.

 

Capture Research Priorities

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What’s new?

Recovering methane from high CO2 content natural gas fields is the next frontier in natural gas extraction. These sources of gas are abundant and large but currently go untapped as the economic and environmental impacts do not make them viable.

In October 2016 a capture skid was delivered to CO2CRC’s Otway Research Facility. Watch a timelapse video of the platform’s delivery and installation.

This compact and cost-effective platform will capture methane from high CO2 content natural gas wells using novel membrane and adsorbent materials. Read more.

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The capture skid arriving at the Otway Research Facility on 10 October 2016.